FLIGHT 3: PopImage Interview

Talks with Flight artists, as well as reviews of related books...
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Post by Kean » Mon Jun 26, 2006 8:17 pm

Yeah, they have TONS of grants available. I totally plan to make use of their travel grant for writers if the opportunity ever arises. Although I hear from Matt (Forsythe) that graphic novelists kind of fall into a grey area in that specific instance.

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Re: Last of the Initial Q's - Follow-Up's to... follow

Post by Azad » Mon Jun 26, 2006 8:47 pm

Kean wrote:
Azad wrote:Honestly, applying for a grant never came to mind. Although I was aware that the government here in Canada, unlike our brother to the south, offers grants to artists who apply for them to facilitate creating their work, I was not aware that they specifially would support a graphic novel. Knowing that now, it isn't an avenue I think I would have persued. I have friends that have done so in the independant film industry and it's a real pain.

I wouldn't want to be coerced into changing my work to win a grant. For example, they may come back and say there wasn't enough Canadian content. After being given total creative freedom from my publisher, I wouldn't want to deal with any commission about whether my work merited support from the governement.


Hey Azad, I should point out that I was awarded one of those grants for Jellaby, and they've been completely hands-off with my work. Obviously, I'd have to stay roughly within the confines of my original outline that I sent to them when I applied for the grant, but there's been absolutely no interference on their part in terms of how I'm making my graphic novel. The process is completely different from the film grants -- there are no peer/content reviews at all for the creative writing grants. You really should apply! It's free government money that you can spend on hookers and blow, and they won't care at all! (well, they might if word gets back to them about that, but like that's going to happen any time soon :roll: )


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Post by J.ELLIS » Tue Jun 27, 2006 2:58 am

Thanks Tony , here's some follow-ups:

FOLLOWUP: How would you describe the premise behind Pucca to new viewers?

FOLLOWUP: Tell us about your Delilah Dirk Project.
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Post by J.ELLIS » Tue Jun 27, 2006 3:28 am

Here's some follow-ups Reagan:

Actually, this was all done in Photoshop. Originally I was determined to do it in gouache or watercolours, but due to the limited time and space I had to work on it, a digital medium was a better choice this time around. One comment I often get is how my digital stuff often resembles traditional media, which isn't something I intentionally set out to do, but I do treat "painting" in Photoshop much like I would regular paint on paper, mostly in how I use specific brushes for specific purposes and so on. So the end result sometimes has a pleasantly organic feel that kind of shows up by surprise.


FOLLOWUP: It does resemble a mix of watercolours and digital, but was just the colouring on the computer? You started with inked pages right?

So, no, Wyit and Sidna are a little more than something I use when I need to tell a quick story. I do have a much, much larger story in the works, which I plan to be a full-length graphic novel in the future. But for now, I'm getting things started by introducing the characters through Flight by a small 'episode' for each volume possible, which has been a really great time for me.


FOLLOWUP: I’m guessing the story of how one came to serve the other is significant to the story you want to tell as well?

Sometimes, yeah, but it doesn't bother me. Right now I'm trying yet again to get into art school, but I'm not worried. Despite having little professional education, I learned an awful lot by simply teaching myself and listening to more experienced artists, as well as learned lots of stuff from my time working for Armor Holdings Inc. My boss Rod Dornsife has been an excellent on-the-job teacher for me, showing me the do's and don’ts of good visual communication in the corporate world. So I don't feel like I'm that out of place when I'm hanging around the rest of the Flight crowd. Still, I do want to go to school! The more experience, the better.


FOLLOWUP: Luckily you can always point your professors towards the bookstore to see your work now.
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Post by Kazu » Tue Jun 27, 2006 3:31 am

Man, this is like the ultimate interview. Heheh. :D Thanks for taking this time, Jonathan. Amy and I are constantly impressed by your thoroughness.
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Post by J.ELLIS » Tue Jun 27, 2006 3:43 am

i'll have the roundtable and the rest of the intro up, say, 24 hours from now

from there we can either put up the roundtable and whatever one on one's are done and continue to add the one-on-ones as they finish up OR we can wait and have the whole thing coinicide with the comic shop in store release
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Post by Tony » Tue Jun 27, 2006 12:02 pm

Kazu wrote:Man, this is like the ultimate interview. Heheh. :D Thanks for taking this time, Jonathan. Amy and I are constantly impressed by your thoroughness.


I second that!

Follow-up answers!

How would you describe the premise behind Pucca to new viewers?

I've been describing it to friends and family as "Hello Kitty... but with ninjas". Then I send them to the website. There's a lot of kung fu, and a lot of kissing.

Tell us about your Delilah Dirk Project.

Delilah Dirk is something I've been casually working on in my spare time. The setting is Europe around the end of the 18th century, and Delilah is an international adventurer specializing in the repatriation of works of art (significant and otherwise). I've been reading a lot of the Horatio Hornblower and Sharpe series of novels, and that quasi-historically-accurate adventuring really appeals to me, so Delilah is my bid to get involved with it. Plus, doing it in comic-book format means I can get excited about exploring the visual opportunities available with the setting.
I found some rough pages for an "origin story" I started working on maybe a year or so ago. Figuring that I'd never have the time to finish them properly, I posted them in the Flight forum. I'm rethinking things now... it would be a lot of fun if Delilah could actually see the light of day.

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Post by dave roman » Tue Jun 27, 2006 1:09 pm

Tony wrote:[
I've been describing it to friends and family as "Hello Kitty... but with ninjas". Then I send them to the website. There's a lot of kung fu, and a lot of kissing.




Oh, man I forgot how much I love those PuCCA flash cartoons!
I can't wait to see the show you're working on!

:D

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Post by dave roman » Tue Jun 27, 2006 6:37 pm

FOLLOWUP: Aside from Communism or Nazi invasion, the image of the ‘Bird Seed Inc’ building actually made me think of the Golden arches.

Ha! I think that’s one of those happy accidents. I just wanted the building to go from looking like a bunny head to a bird. So the golden arches are meant to evoke the wings. But I guess the McDonalds subtext, worked itself right in there! Creepy!


FOLLOWUP: Do you have a dream-list of artists or writers you’d like to see get involved with the magazine?

We asked Frank Miller to draw a SpongeBob comic back when the movie came out. He considered it, but was too busy making his own movie or something. Chris Duffy tried to get Bill Waterson to come out of retirement and do a comic cover (or pretty much anything he wanted), but couldn’t make it happen. I may try and follow up on that at some point.


FOLLOWUP: Do you find you still have an attentive fan base to the characters’ adventures?

The fans John and I have met seem to be really supportive and insanely patient. Usually they’re just happy that the series is still being continued, because they had trouble finding/ordering back issues from local comic shops. We kind of shot ourselves in the foot by getting caught up in day jobs and freelance gigs, so there have been some really long gaps between issues. But we’ve tried to make up for that by hitting as many conventions as possible and always putting all of our heart and soul into each issue. I always think it’s cool that Jax fans tend to lend out their copies of the books to friends and then end up buying replacement copies when they see us at conventions. I usually give them extra buttons and stickers to thank them for spreading the love.

FOLLOWUP: How do you find working on Agnes compared to other projects? When people think of SLG, Dave Roman isn’t the first name that springs to mind when you consider the tone of other projects you’ve done.

I tend to have very eclectic tastes that trickle down into the types of stories I want to tell. I think SLG puts out the most diverse line of comics of any publisher, ever. Street Angel, Life of a Fetus, Patty Cake and Friends, Bear, Halo and Sprocket, Serenity Rose, Pirate Club, Squee…they cover a lot of different sensibilities and art styles. And the books they published by Evan Dorkin and Andi Watson in particular were a huge part of what made me first want to work in comics. I know they’re often referred to as the “goth comics” publisher. But even more so, Slave Labor is a company that puts out comics that have a sense of humor. Often a dark, twisted, sense of humor. And even though Agnes is way serious compared to Teen Boat, or Astronaut Elementary…there’s a lot to it that is playful and absurd.

FOLLOWUP: Do you feel you’ve reached a bit of an untapped market here? This isn’t like one of the big companies doing some licensed project but really seems to speak true to the fans and nostalgia of the classics. I personally don’t know shit about video games and remember very little about the games of my childhood, but I can look at something like the Frogger strip and get it right away.

Well, there seem to be a lot of parody comics on the internet about videogames. And, lots of comic strips about the ins and outs of the videogame industry. But with Life Meter, it’s just a total love letter to the games themselves. It’s for and by kids who grew up in the 80s or 90s who view these characters as icons the way most people see Superman, Batman, Spiderman, and so on. People get excited drawing these characters they don’t own, not for personal gain, just simply for the fun of it. The site allows us to connect all our childhoods together and have a big nostalgia party.

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Post by Azad » Tue Jun 27, 2006 7:12 pm

Kazu wrote:Man, this is like the ultimate interview. Heheh. :D Thanks for taking this time, Jonathan. Amy and I are constantly impressed by your thoroughness.


it's going to take readers 5 hours to read :)
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Post by J.ELLIS » Tue Jun 27, 2006 10:59 pm

dave roman wrote: We asked Frank Miller to draw a SpongeBob comic back when the movie came out. He considered it, but was too busy making his own movie or something. Chris Duffy tried to get Bill Waterson to come out of retirement and do a comic cover (or pretty much anything he wanted), but couldn’t make it happen. I may try and follow up on that at some point.


Watterson would've been amazing

Frank Miller would've been... interesting

"But Spongebob why are you stabbing those people?"
"Because it turns me on. WHHEEEEEE!"
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Post by Kean » Tue Jun 27, 2006 11:06 pm

It goes without saying that scoring Bill Watterson would've been a massive coup, but this...

J.ELLIS wrote:"But Spongebob why are you stabbing those people?"
"Because it turns me on. WHHEEEEEE!"

...this, I would've paid good money to have seen. And like, Spongebob's squirrel friend doing stripteases and Patrick walking around without his trunks on, his package hanging out and shit? That would've been AMAZING.

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Post by J.ELLIS » Tue Jun 27, 2006 11:12 pm

i really want to make some joke about spongebob getting crabs
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Post by Kean » Tue Jun 27, 2006 11:13 pm

Ahahahahaa

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Post by Reagan » Tue Jun 27, 2006 11:58 pm

J.ELLIS wrote:Here's some follow-ups Reagan:

Actually, this was all done in Photoshop. Originally I was determined to do it in gouache or watercolours, but due to the limited time and space I had to work on it, a digital medium was a better choice this time around. One comment I often get is how my digital stuff often resembles traditional media, which isn't something I intentionally set out to do, but I do treat "painting" in Photoshop much like I would regular paint on paper, mostly in how I use specific brushes for specific purposes and so on. So the end result sometimes has a pleasantly organic feel that kind of shows up by surprise.


FOLLOWUP: It does resemble a mix of watercolours and digital, but was just the colouring on the computer? You started with inked pages right?


Some people look at me funny when I say this, but the entire thing was done on a computer without any scanned sketches at all. All the "inking" was done in Photoshop with the help of a Wacom tablet. Basically all I did was just slop around some flat black shadows and lines until I got what I wanted.

So, no, Wyit and Sidna are a little more than something I use when I need to tell a quick story. I do have a much, much larger story in the works, which I plan to be a full-length graphic novel in the future. But for now, I'm getting things started by introducing the characters through Flight by a small 'episode' for each volume possible, which has been a really great time for me.


FOLLOWUP: I’m guessing the story of how one came to serve the other is significant to the story you want to tell as well?


Man, you're reading my mind like a Tijuana Bible. Yeah, there is a lot of stuff to be told throughout the story about what it means to serve. If it were being written by someone else, Wyit would just be a sort of background character or sidekick to Sidna; the anonymous big-eared awkward fox who carries the heroine's sword for her. That's fine, but the reason I wanted to make the story told with more emphasis on Wyit serving Sidna rather than Sidna being served by Wyit is because I think it resonates better with people that way. Everyone can relate to having to do some sort of chore or work for somebody else, not everyone can relate to being the powerful knight girl with rad sword skills. Everyone WISHES they could be the badass fighter, but not everyone can relate to being one.

For me, I spent most of my life in middleschool and highschool kind of feeling in the background while everyone else was more talented and popular, so it's easier for me to write about a character like Wyit because he's material I know from personal experience.

Sometimes, yeah, but it doesn't bother me. Right now I'm trying yet again to get into art school, but I'm not worried. Despite having little professional education, I learned an awful lot by simply teaching myself and listening to more experienced artists, as well as learned lots of stuff from my time working for Armor Holdings Inc. My boss Rod Dornsife has been an excellent on-the-job teacher for me, showing me the do's and don’ts of good visual communication in the corporate world. So I don't feel like I'm that out of place when I'm hanging around the rest of the Flight crowd. Still, I do want to go to school! The more experience, the better.


FOLLOWUP: Luckily you can always point your professors towards the bookstore to see your work now.


Yep! That's one thing I'm definitely going to have fun with. The closest thing to having anything influenced by me being seen on a store shelf were a couple cover illustrations done by my friend Sean Rubin for Brian Jacques' Redwall audiobooks, which I gave Sean a couple small suggestions about painting clouds and stuff for. So whenever I went to a bookstore with friends, I'd pull one of the Redwall audiobooks off a shelf and say "See that tiny cloud there?! It wouldn't be there if I hadn't suggested it to the artist!". But now I can finally pull a whole freaking book off the shelf that has my name on the back cover AND my own small story in it. It's pretty thrilling.

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