illustration thread

Post illustrations, animation, graphic design, sketches, etc.
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Steve LeCouilliard
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Post by Steve LeCouilliard » Wed Feb 06, 2008 9:24 pm

I think the scratchy pen lines mostly. Sort of a general illustrative quality. The first pictur that made me think of Farel was the superhero in your first post. It reminded me of that new book he's working 'Omega' I think it's called?

Either way, great stuff!
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almo
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Post by almo » Thu Feb 07, 2008 8:18 am

Yay for spiral elbows!

chris
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Post by chris » Mon Feb 11, 2008 12:37 pm

frank your drawings are hawt. i love the weird shapes you manage to tweak your figures into...super-nice

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Frank Stockton
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yawn

Post by Frank Stockton » Wed Feb 20, 2008 1:01 pm

I really am busy, though it looks like nothing's been going on. Well, better and larger projects rather than next-day spots i guess. Except for this one for the New Yorker.

Supposed to be Dennis Quaid in the new movie "Vantage Point." I bet there will be changes before the day is done...


f.
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"I do not get discouraged, because every wrong attempt discarded is another step forward"
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KidVideo
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Post by KidVideo » Wed Feb 20, 2008 4:58 pm

franks got those boogie fingers!

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Frank Stockton
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Post by Frank Stockton » Thu Feb 21, 2008 7:39 am

KidVideo wrote:franks got those boogie fingers!
Ok, I have no clue what that means but I'll take it as a compliment. Thanks! :)

Here's the New Yorker piece, completely re-done. The AD came back with a laundry list of changes, among them "make it JUST Dennis Quaid" and "use a different reference photo because this doesn't look enough like him" and "lose the smoke and replace it with a little bit of blood." There was really no other way but to re-do the entire thing.

This is the most frustrating part of the job. I've been staring at Quaid so long that I don't have any clue if this even looks like him at all. I guess it probably doesn't, and that this might get killed. I've really earned my $750 this time around, but I also wish there was a clause about changes and extra cash because this is way beyond what's normal... (whether or not it gets published).

Now to the other 40 jobs on the table....


f.
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... by the way that's Ron Burgundy on the bottom left with the cool hair and mustache. I'm such a nerd.
"I do not get discouraged, because every wrong attempt discarded is another step forward"
--Thomas Edison

http://www.frankstockton.com

KidVideo
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Post by KidVideo » Thu Feb 21, 2008 9:10 am

what do you use to color your illustrations frank?

ps: boogie fingers are good, means your quick with the drawing.

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Og
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Post by Og » Thu Feb 21, 2008 9:13 am

Nothing wrong with your technique, Frank. I prefer the first one, but I suppose that's natural. I do believe the first one looks more like Dennis than the second one, but Dennis also doesn't even look like Dennis anymore so you can't be blamed for that.

When it comes to these art contracts, how much of it is you calling the shots, and how much of it is boilerplate from the client, if you don't mind me asking.

In my case, after 25 years in the biz, I finally had a producer clue me in on Change Fees and Kill Fees. I'm not sure how it is in the illustration field, but in CG and animation, there are targets to hit along the way to a completed piece - design sketch, rough geometry, blocked animation (without these targets getting checked off every step of the way, there's no objective point of view) - and signed-off by the AD (very important). Any changes they ask for after that above and beyond "normal" AD wear and tear, they pay for, to the tune of a previously-agreed-to hourly fee (and this is different from the previously negotiated flat fee for the finished piece). Also, if they kill it after a certain amount of work has been done, they're still responsible for a certain previously-agreed-to pro-rated amount.

You may not be able to say, but is an arrangement like this typical of illustration gigs? Do you think it could be? :)

Oh, by the way, I agree- thou doth indeed posess the digits that bear prodigious boogie, or to use the more crude vernacular, "Franks got those boogie fingers TRUE!"
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almo
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Post by almo » Fri Feb 22, 2008 9:28 am

Just in my opinion, the second one looks more like Quaid than the first, but I'm not really seeing him in either. The pic of Forest Whitaker looks spot on, though...

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Frank Stockton
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Post by Frank Stockton » Fri Feb 22, 2008 9:33 am

Og wrote: When it comes to these art contracts, how much of it is you calling the shots, and how much of it is boilerplate from the client, if you don't mind me asking.

I'm not sure how it is in the illustration field, but in CG and animation, there are targets to hit along the way to a completed piece - design sketch, rough geometry, blocked animation (without these targets getting checked off every step of the way, there's no objective point of view) - and signed-off by the AD (very important). Any changes they ask for after that above and beyond "normal" AD wear and tear, they pay for, to the tune of a previously-agreed-to hourly fee (and this is different from the previously negotiated flat fee for the finished piece). Also, if they kill it after a certain amount of work has been done, they're still responsible for a certain previously-agreed-to pro-rated amount.
Hey Og,

The standard practice is similar. A finished job that gets killed pays 100%. Usually one or two minor changes are acceptable to the artist, with additional compensation for major changes (re-doing the entire piece DOES constitute major changes). Different companies usually have their own kill fees that are based on how far you are along. If i've done sketches I usually try to charge 50%, but some places only offer 25% and some only 40%-- that SHOULD be discussed up front but I'll admit, usually isn't. But everyone has an adjustable kill fee.

Incidentally, I ended up re-doing the head of this guy yet AGAIN for the final, which there were more changes on, which I think might actually run.

The AD called me yesterday and suggested another angle for the head, I said "I don't have time to do this, I've got a lot of other jobs to get to," implying that I wanted them to just kill the piece and give me my money (its fair, the New Yorker kills pieces all the time). He called me back 20 minutes later offering me another 30% on the job, raising the price to $1,000... which I didn't turn down.

All in all it was a nightmare. The New Yorker in particular is a strange place to work for because everyone wants to work for them in theory but no one actually wants to work for them (well, of my friends anyway, everyone has had negative experiences).

I LOVE being in the New Yorker and so I have a hard time turning them down. I need to do that more often though.

f.
"I do not get discouraged, because every wrong attempt discarded is another step forward"
--Thomas Edison

http://www.frankstockton.com

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Frank Stockton
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Post by Frank Stockton » Fri Feb 22, 2008 9:34 am

KidVideo wrote:what do you use to color your illustrations frank?
I color in photoshop.
"I do not get discouraged, because every wrong attempt discarded is another step forward"
--Thomas Edison

http://www.frankstockton.com

campy22
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Post by campy22 » Fri Feb 22, 2008 10:02 am

(^_^)
solid

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Frank Stockton
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Post by Frank Stockton » Fri Feb 22, 2008 11:39 am

update: it got killed.

oh well.


f.
"I do not get discouraged, because every wrong attempt discarded is another step forward"
--Thomas Edison

http://www.frankstockton.com

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dik pose
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Post by dik pose » Fri Feb 22, 2008 12:58 pm

Doh!... BTW, great Thomas Edison quote you got going there...

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Og
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Post by Og » Fri Feb 22, 2008 7:24 pm

Thanks for the in-depth explanation. Nice for the people to see how the Real World works it.
Frank Stockton wrote:update: it got killed.

oh well.
Oh well, indeed. On to, as you say, the other jobs. And I concur - "Sorry, can't do it at this time" is a phrase you might look into adding to your reperetoire for certain clients from time to time.
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