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Posted: Sat Jul 30, 2005 2:03 pm
by wendy w
How about the wyrd museum trilogy by Robin Jarvis?

Posted: Tue Aug 16, 2005 9:31 pm
by Mike Laughead
The Earthsea trilogy by Ursula K. LeGuin is great, and it's not typical fantasy either... I don't know how to describe it.

(I also like the Alvin Maker series as well as everything by Orson Scott Card.)

Posted: Sat Aug 20, 2005 7:30 pm
by Lee M
Mike Laughead wrote:The Earthsea trilogy by Ursula K. LeGuin is great, and it's not typical fantasy either... I don't know how to describe it.

(I also like the Alvin Maker series as well as everything by Orson Scott Card.)
1. There are now more than 3 Earthsea volumes - 5 novels and a story collection, I believe.
2. Ursula Le Guin hated the Earthsea miniseries, so when it comes out on DVD don't ask her to autograph your copy.

Posted: Sat Aug 20, 2005 8:12 pm
by Mike Laughead
Lee M wrote: 1. There are now more than 3 Earthsea volumes - 5 novels and a story collection, I believe.
2. Ursula Le Guin hated the Earthsea miniseries, so when it comes out on DVD don't ask her to autograph your copy.
THANK YOU! I always loved the first three books, and I'm sure I'll love these next three, especially because the fourth book is about Ged (I looked it up on Amazon)

Posted: Thu Sep 08, 2005 3:41 pm
by Hot Soup
If you have the stamina for a long read, try Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell, by Susanna Clarke. Truly, deeply, awe-inspiring stuff. Done in a very classic style, and set in victorian england where magic is re-emerging. Also contains faeries the way there were meant to be; scary, unfailingly polite, and barely sane. My favorite fantasy after Tolkien.

Posted: Wed Nov 09, 2005 4:49 am
by Stijn
-Anything by Roger Zelazny, but specifically the Amber books and Creatures of light and darkness...

-China Mieville: King Rat (London underground Drum& Bass Mythological fantasy! :-)) Perdido street station, The Scar, Iron Council.

-Most of the writings of Paul di Filippo (fantasy/SF/slipstream)

-Philip Reeve: The Hungry City Chronicles. (Young adult but brilliant, like His Dark Materials...)

-Michael Moorcock, if you have the heart for it.. .

-Will update if I think of more, nice thread :)

Posted: Wed Nov 09, 2005 1:04 pm
by Vince
Wow, when the author of the work hates your adaptation, you know you've fucked up. :shock: Speaking of which, what's Alan Moore up to?

Posted: Thu Nov 10, 2005 1:00 pm
by jdalton
This might seem like a bit of an odd suggestion, but I recommend "Journey to the West," a classical Chinese novel written during the Ming dynasty. It is the only fantasy book I've found that can compete with Tolkien on an equal playing field while at the same time not being a rip-off of him- even remotely.

Because it's a classical Chinese novel the flowery language and off-topic side stories can be really heavy going at times, but it's got magic, epic battles between weird creatures, ridiculously powerful kungfu moves, and great characters (the Monkey King!) It was clearly written as a fantasy story for general audiences.

Of course I've so far only managed to read the first quarter of it. It's a massive book.

Jonathon Dalton
A Mad Tea-Party

Posted: Thu Nov 10, 2005 8:12 pm
by Ian Jay
From my private library...

~Magic For Beginners, by Kelly Link. These short stories will blow the top off of your head, that is how crazy they are. Plus, the author sent me a free t-shirt after I e-mailed her compliments, so I feel that I have an obligation to promote her as much as possible.

~The Thursday Next series, by Jasper Fforde. Imagine a world where people actually read books! Far-fetched, right? This is an inventive series of books for any lovers of literature. Plus, the people on its official ffan fforums are the most well-mannered and grammatically precise people you will ever meet on the Internet.

~Summerland, by Michael Chabon. From the guy who made the guys who make comics famous, this is a "children's novel" that's smart enough for adults to read. At first you think it's about baseball and coming of age, but then you realize that it's about a bizarre set of alternate realities with folklore woven in. And then you realize that it really is all about baseball.

If I come up with anything else, I'll let you guys know. Fantastic fiction is awesome; it tells us not about how things look, but about how things are.

~IJ

PS: Better add Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas to the list. I'm reading this one right now, and there is no freaking way that those two guys could ingest all those drugs and still survive. Fantasy? Reality? In Vegas it's hard to tell.

Posted: Fri Nov 11, 2005 5:04 pm
by wendy w
I love the Thursday Next books.
Just thought I'd add that.
:D

Posted: Mon Jan 23, 2006 11:41 am
by MisterSpook
Stijn wrote:-Anything by Roger Zelazny, but specifically the Amber books and Creatures of light and darkness...
)
I second Zelazny. Though if you want to be crazy, hunt down a copy of Shadow Jack (Jack of Shadows?). It's one of his (many) out of print treasures.

George R. R. Martin's Song of Ice and Fire is also really good.

Terry Pratchett is also a fantastic, if not hilarious read. His Discworld series in particular.

Earthsea is good. Its also (if I've heard correctly) the subject of the latest Miyazaki film.

Posted: Fri Mar 10, 2006 12:45 pm
by agremar
I'll second this and add Water Margin (108 stars of destiny that gets re-used in games like Suikoden).

quote="jdalton"]This might seem like a bit of an odd suggestion, but I recommend "Journey to the West," a classical Chinese novel written during the Ming dynasty. It is the only fantasy book I've found that can compete with Tolkien on an equal playing field while at the same time not being a rip-off of him- even remotely.

Because it's a classical Chinese novel the flowery language and off-topic side stories can be really heavy going at times, but it's got magic, epic battles between weird creatures, ridiculously powerful kungfu moves, and great characters (the Monkey King!) It was clearly written as a fantasy story for general audiences.

Of course I've so far only managed to read the first quarter of it. It's a massive book.

Jonathon Dalton
A Mad Tea-Party[/quote]

Posted: Tue Jul 10, 2007 8:51 pm
by t0nichi
Neil Gaiman's Sandman

Posted: Tue May 20, 2008 6:12 pm
by ChevyRay
Stijn wrote:-Philip Reeve: The Hungry City Chronicles. (Young adult but brilliant, like His Dark Materials...)
I am on the third book now, and I'll second this heavily. Very very enjoyable.

If you haven't read either of these, just read them.

Hungry City Chronicles / Mortal Engines Philip Reeve
His Dark Materials Philip Pullman

Posted: Tue May 20, 2008 6:35 pm
by dark77778
*snicker* Well I'm working on a novella myself right now similar to Narnia I guess, but lessee here, fantasy adventure genre eh? There's the Pendragon series which I highly recommend if you've never picked up a copy. His Dark Materials [Golden Compass, you know, that series] is good if you take it with whatever level of salt you wish. There's also the The Chrestomanci series is...well it's not the best written stuff, but one must read The Lives of Christopher Chant; I can never get enough of that book, and it's a nice light read too. There's also the Pigs Don't Fly series, it's a little formulaic but it's rather heartwarming at points and fun to read most of the time. There's also this young fiction Canadian trilogy that I read called The Serpent's Egg, which was surprisingly good once you got past the Canadian patriotism at the beginning of each book. Aaaand finally the Dragon and the George series is a nice comedic adventure of a 20th century student turned medieval mageblade in a lengthy and hilarious saga.