Tommysaurus Rex

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Finnegan
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Tommysaurus Rex

Post by Finnegan » Sun May 16, 2004 1:24 pm

http://www.aintitcool.com/display.cgi?id=17540

man i sooooo can't wait for this book. Doug TenNapel just flat out rocks!


=BoB=

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Finnegan
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Post by Finnegan » Thu May 20, 2004 10:13 pm

happy million$ Doug TenNapel
http://www.aintitcool.com/display.cgi?id=17583


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Kazu
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Post by Kazu » Fri May 21, 2004 12:26 am

I was lucky enough to see the original Tommysaurus pages it had text and was sent to the printers, and it looked awesome. Simply awesome. :D I can't wait to read it...
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Mothos
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Post by Mothos » Fri May 21, 2004 12:14 pm

That's looking really good! I'm going to have to pick this up.

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Clank
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Post by Clank » Fri May 21, 2004 2:36 pm

The book must be PRETTY FREAKING AWESOME if the Moriarty person says it's better than Creature Tech! I can't wait...

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Siftland
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Post by Siftland » Sat May 22, 2004 2:31 pm

I liked Creature Tech alright (and the game The Neverhood).

But what turned me off to Tenapel is his overt and unavoidable injection of his faith. I think an author/creator that is involved in escapism or fantasy (like Tenapel) has an obligation to not make judgements on specific religions. It didn't preach but I found it hard to sympathize with a character that comes to embrace a doctrine I am completely at odds with.

I always felt that a good work of fantasy that included religion created their own versions, equivalents, and never made judgements on them (anyone read Strangehaven, even Bone). As a parallel, for me to not remain objective, I'd be forced to openly bash religion, specifically Christianity. But I don't feel I have the right to make judgemant calls like that in my work.

I have no idea what religion most of the creators I really respect are. They are objective and don't turn their stories into almost a piece of propaganda like Tenapel did in Creature Tech. Or any author does who 'makes a stand' on a religious issue.

Anyway, I don't want this to turn into a relgion 'yay' or 'nay' flamewar (have their been any flamewars on this board yet? heh), so maybe you can just tell me what you think about the issue.

Me personally, I couldn't appreciate Creature Tech fully because of its inclusion of Christianity.

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neil
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Post by neil » Sat May 22, 2004 9:30 pm

I haven't read Creature Tech, so I can't comment on the book specifically, but I can understand the contentiousness of this issue of religion in art.

I generally look disfavorably upon blending political (and religious) messages into things--because at that point it becomes propaganda, which, for me, is at odds with the point of art, in that it simply orders someone to think or feel a certain way. (Of course, if it's openly propaganda, it can be taken at its own level.)

That said, religious inspiration can inspire some of the greatest art. Even though I'm not Christian, I was moved by Carl Th. Dreyer's "Ordet" and Sufjan Stevens' "Seven Swans," for example, because they beautifully relay the personal wonder of faith, perhaps even specifically the Christian kind. This is pretty distinguishable from someone simply trying to convince you that a religion is good or bad for you.

So, I agree that it's fair if political messages throw up a red flag, but I think they can be redeemed completely.

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dik pose
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Post by dik pose » Sat May 22, 2004 10:06 pm

Religion, politics, and art have always been intertwined...it's a thin line that separates blantant propoganda pieces from slick artwork. Look back in history and find the point where art began to separate its self from those topics, it actually wasn't all that long ago.

If someone is very religious, I dont think its a problem to express that faith in their stories or art because ultimately it is a piece of personal work; it is then the consumer's responsibility to choose whether or not they want to buy the product. At that point it becomes personal preference.

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Azzamckazza
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finally!

Post by Azzamckazza » Wed Jun 02, 2004 7:21 pm

Someone who thinks the same!
I've been a fan of Doug since Earthworm Jim and hunted (interstate no less) for CreatureTech. I love it - the ideas, the art, the dialogue - but I was very let down by the end.
I tend to think that religion - or even faith - should be alluded to in work so that the reader can make up their mind. As someone who believes in all and no religions I found it almost inappropriate to have Dr Ongwearing the cross at the end. But, in the end, it's not my piece and it's my problem.
But it did seem preachy, and you can have faith in other ways - especially after travelling through dimensions and meeting other aliens. Cheezus - the book is full of aliens and strnge beings that aren't mentioned in the bible and would be denounced as the work of Satan in a church.

Meh, it's still miles above most graphic novels.

My opinion of Doug went down a little more when I saw him post 'God bless George Bush' on his site. Again, my problem...but come on...

And while I don't doubt that Tommysaurus Rex will be awesome...I'd take Moriarty's review down a few pegs....read his CreatureTech review...it's positive...but waaaaay too positive. Mind you, it was the reason I have the comic today.
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Rad Sechrist
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Post by Rad Sechrist » Wed Jun 02, 2004 10:17 pm

I was raised christian, but left it behind a few years ago. I even whent on christian missions and stuff. I'm really bitter about christianity and if I read this book, I would probably get upset at the christianity in it. At the same point, I would respect the author for puting what he believes in the story. As long as he is not trying to trick anyone, I think it's good that he didn't have to change his story just to please people.

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Sham Zmam
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Post by Sham Zmam » Thu Jul 29, 2004 9:02 pm

Sorry to resurrect an old thread, but I just bought Tommysaurus Rex at the San Diego ComicCon, and wanted to recommend it.

It's a very sweet little story, and I enjoyed it very much. The art is beautiful, and I really liked the pacing.
I can see a lot of people not liking it-- if you're one of those people that's bugged by incredibly unrealistic things happening in a realistic world, you're not gonna like this comic. You've gotta be able to do the whole suspension-of-disbelief thing to get into it.
But if you can fire up that suspension, you'll be enjoying a very touching story about a boy and his pet dinosaur.


Oh, and as for the inclusion of Christianity in Creature Tech, I really liked it. My brother had just come out of a long phase of acting like Dr. Ong when I first read it-- not just choosing atheism, but being a total "I am superior to those uneducated Christians" dick about it. This went on for an annoyingly long time.
Finally, he met a guy in grad school who talked him into respecting the faith and ideas of others. Not necessarily agreeing, just not looking down on anyone.
I mentioned this to Doug TenNapel at ComiCon when buying Tommysaurus Rex, and that I planned to get a copy of the book for my brother-- because it's a great story, and because I saw a lot of my brother's experiences in it. He didn't take quite the 180 that Ong did, but still, he changed.
He seemed to take what I was saying as, "I'm gonna buy your book to convince my brother he's wrong."
I don't remember what he said verbatim, but it was something along the lines of, "Well, comics shouldn't be written to change people, or try and convince them of anything-- just to tell a story."

Creature Tech really isn't trying to convert anyone. It's just a book by a dude whose faith is a big part of his life.
I think it's really unfortunate for anyone to be unable to look past the religious tones of a comic. You're gonna miss a hell of a lot of good stories that way.

(Hell, I'm rereading Preacher right now, and it's basically a huge series of comics about what an asshole God is. Doesn't bother me-- I like the characters.)

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deantrippe
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Post by deantrippe » Thu Jul 29, 2004 9:26 pm

Sham Zmam wrote: My brother had just come out of a long phase of acting like Dr. Ong when I first read it-- not just choosing atheism, but being a total "I am superior to those uneducated Christians" dick about it. This went on for an annoyingly long time.
Been there, too. Glad to be out of it.

I'm with you man. I don't think Doug was being preachy or anything. What's so bad about a story where a guy comes to faith, rather than losing it? (And by the way, how cool is the company that publishes both kinds?

I enjoy good stories. (And I loved Preacher, too, man!)

Hey, and if you haven't already, check out Doug's new project:

http://www.sockbaby.com/

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Clank
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Post by Clank » Thu Jul 29, 2004 9:26 pm

I got Tommysaurus Rex at the Con, too. I read it the night that I bought it and really enjoyed it. I didn't like it quite as much as Creature Tech, though because the scale of the book just, um, didn't seem as grand, nor was the plot as complex as Creature Tech's. What bugged me a bit in it (Stephen touched on the whole suspension of disbelief thing) was that the people in the book did not seem that surprised that some boy had found a T-rex. They were like, "Oh wow, a T-rex. That's cool.". Then they were over it. I did really enjoy the book, and the art was awesome as always, but I didn't like the whole not-surprised-to-find-a-T-rex factor.

As for the whole injection of faith into the comics thing, I didn't really notice Tommysaurus Rex having any of that. If it did, it wasn't as overt as in Creature Tech. In Creature Tech, I actually enjoyed the ending immensely because I thought it showed that you could have science and religion together. At least, that was my take on it. I'm a fairly devout Christian, though, so... meh.

Oh, and I did a book report on Creature Tech. :D

I got an A. HA!

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deantrippe
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Post by deantrippe » Thu Jul 29, 2004 10:17 pm

I had a pretty big publishing deal in the works, at least for me, the weekend I read Creature Tech at MegaCon a couple years back. The job had some stuff in it that I disagreed with, as I like to do all ages kind of work. I mean, I like my kid sister and my grandmother to be able to see all my work. And I don't like cutting off a large segment of readership just so I can claim to be "edgy." (Not dissing folks who do, it's just no my thing.)

Anyway, after reading Creature Tech, which had been optioned before it even shipped, I realized I didn't have to compromise to catch a break. I can be a Christian comic book artist and do cool stuff that everyone can read. Maybe Axel Alonso won't hire me, but who gives a damn?

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dik pose
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Post by dik pose » Thu Jul 29, 2004 11:04 pm

I bought this at con, i read it yesterday, I liked it tremendously...good story.

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