Coraline

Discuss films.
User avatar
io
Posts: 325
Joined: Wed Apr 21, 2004 11:50 am
Location: La Habra
Contact:

Post by io » Sun Feb 08, 2009 6:34 pm

Yeah, stay until the end of the credits.

Josh, someone asked how the fading to white was done but the guys didn't know, hopefully that will be on a DVD "making of". They did say that Henry Selick wanted everything to be done in stop motion even when it would have been a lot easier to do it CG, and the example they used was the rain falling outside the windows of the house.

User avatar
Rythem 'Scat' Cat
Posts: 17
Joined: Sat Nov 15, 2008 5:39 pm
Location: Mission, TX

Post by Rythem 'Scat' Cat » Sun Feb 08, 2009 8:14 pm

<a href="http://s148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/b ... raline.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/b ... raline.jpg" border="0" alt="Coraline by meeezzz"></a>
Oh well, I tried. :3

User avatar
Rythem 'Scat' Cat
Posts: 17
Joined: Sat Nov 15, 2008 5:39 pm
Location: Mission, TX

Post by Rythem 'Scat' Cat » Sun Feb 08, 2009 8:15 pm

Image
Sorry, didn't work last time. I'm new at this.

User avatar
dark77778
Posts: 468
Joined: Thu Apr 24, 2008 11:03 am
Location: Toronto

Post by dark77778 » Sun Feb 08, 2009 10:30 pm

That picture reminds me: I couldn't have been the only person who's jaw dropped when they realized that her star pajamas were glow in the dark could I?
I'm my own breed of eccentric.

User avatar
Rythem 'Scat' Cat
Posts: 17
Joined: Sat Nov 15, 2008 5:39 pm
Location: Mission, TX

Post by Rythem 'Scat' Cat » Mon Feb 09, 2009 4:58 pm

dark77778 wrote:That picture reminds me: I couldn't have been the only person who's jaw dropped when they realized that her star pajamas were glow in the dark could I?
Heh, I noticed it pretty quickly, but I'm not sure if I should have made them glow blue last time I saw in the film. At least, I think they were blue. :?

User avatar
SonOfaRich
Posts: 676
Joined: Mon Dec 22, 2003 1:43 am

Post by SonOfaRich » Tue Feb 10, 2009 8:36 pm

Just got back from seeing this and was a little underwhelmed. The 3D was cool, and there's not a whole lot of gimmicky 3D effects, so I felt it's not necessary to watch it in 3D. What the 3D does is give you a better sense of depth throughout the movie. That is a neat effect and it's something I wouldn't mind seeing in all films to come.

I wish the story could have been better, but I did like all the characters. The movie looked great and I loved the soundtrack. I guess I was expecting something in the story to surprise me, but it felt like I've seen it all before.
Intergalactic proton powered electrical tentacle advertising droids!!!!!

User avatar
jcaffoe
Posts: 264
Joined: Sun Dec 23, 2007 6:28 pm
Contact:

Post by jcaffoe » Tue Feb 10, 2009 10:47 pm

SonOfaRich wrote:I wish the story could have been better, but I did like all the characters. The movie looked great and I loved the soundtrack. I guess I was expecting something in the story to surprise me, but it felt like I've seen it all before.
You know, that's actually why I liked it. It was everything I had seen before but presented in new and different ways that pulled different heartstrings.

I'm a HUUUGE fan of 'through the looking glass' type stories. Alice in Wonderland and Spirited Away are two of my favorite animated films, and The Phantom Tollbooth is my all-time favorite novel (and story). The basic premise of all of these stories gives an extremely abstract setting that can be presented in incredibly different ways, and teach very different lessons (self-reliance, the power of knowledge, there's no place like home, etc.).

I think what struck me this time was that it wasn't another story about inner strength and self-reliance, as I expected it to be. Coraline was already an incredibly bright, self-reliant character, and never really came across a struggle she didn't solve with ease, through blind luck, or with some help from a friend.

I think the overlying theme was that for better or worse, things aren't always what they seem. Sometimes the mundane world can house incredible things, sometimes your dreams can turn out to be nightmares, and sometimes the kid next door isn't the idiot you think he is. I mean really, nothing changed in the end of the film. Coraline just learned that sometimes things aren't as bad as you make them out to be, which I thought was a really strong message.

That and the film was OH MY GOD gorgeous. Worth seeing twice just for the eye candy. I'm not usually a proponent of 3D (at all) but this film really won me over. I'm not sure I prefer it by any means, but man was it fun to look at. Especially the scene with the rain drops sliding down the window...

I think (and hope) LAIKA has a loooong future ahead of it.

User avatar
dark77778
Posts: 468
Joined: Thu Apr 24, 2008 11:03 am
Location: Toronto

Post by dark77778 » Wed Feb 11, 2009 12:28 am

jcaffoe wrote: I'm a HUUUGE fan of 'through the looking glass' type stories.
Go see Mirror Mask then if you haven't already.
I'm my own breed of eccentric.

User avatar
Ganter
Posts: 1508
Joined: Thu Feb 26, 2004 8:40 pm
Location: Alhambra, CA
Contact:

Post by Ganter » Wed Feb 11, 2009 10:52 am

I thought the puppetry and craft of it was absolutely amazing, and it was worth seeing in the theater in 3D for that alone. I couldn't really get into the story, though. I guess I'm old-fashioned in that I do like more traditional fairy tales and fantasies that are rooted in problems that are more dramatic. It was hard for me to feel anything watching this, I'm not sure if it was because it was stop-motion which I tend to have difficulty immersing myself in (I had the same problem with Nightmare Before Christmas) or if it was just that I couldn't relate to Coraline's character very much. But I was very impressed and glad that I saw it anyway, because I know there's people out there that will just love this (people like my husband!). I just wasn't one of those people... but I still admire and respect the artistry and care put into it. I was very impressed.

Unfortunately... we did NOT stay for the credits!!!! GAH! I'll have to check it on dvd.

User avatar
Kean
Site Admin
Posts: 4562
Joined: Wed Aug 20, 2003 8:24 am
Location: Toronto
Contact:

Post by Kean » Wed Feb 11, 2009 12:55 pm

I know the comparisons are going to be inevitable, but I did prefer the book over the film. While the visuals in the movie were astounding, I felt the passages from the book that resonated with me most didn't quite make the translation to the screen -- something that nobody should be faulted for, it's just the different nature of prose vs. film.

What I preferred about the book was that it had a much more internal study of Coraline's character -- moments where she is bucking herself up to be brave, knowing that she is in a near-constant state of fear (the one mention of it in the film, where she says "be brave" in her head didn't really sell me on her state of mind), or the compassion she shows her Other Father in the basement -- those are the sorts of thing that made me fall in love with the book in the first place (Coraline is far and away my favourite of Gaiman's books).

But that's not to take anything away from the movie -- it's a wonderfully well-crafted film, and no matter how you look at it, it's still a good, solid story at the core. I enjoyed the movie, just not as much as I did the book. :)

And as an added point, I saw this in 3D, and was not very impressed by it. In static scenes, the 3D was great, but when there was a lot of motion on screen, there seemed to be a lot of jitter (moreso, I imagine, than stop motion would normally introduce), which got annoying pretty damn fast, mostly because I couldn't actually SEE what was going on. I would happily go back and see this in plain ol' 2D.

User avatar
jcaffoe
Posts: 264
Joined: Sun Dec 23, 2007 6:28 pm
Contact:

Post by jcaffoe » Wed Feb 11, 2009 2:38 pm

Kean wrote: And as an added point, I saw this in 3D, and was not very impressed by it. In static scenes, the 3D was great, but when there was a lot of motion on screen, there seemed to be a lot of jitter (moreso, I imagine, than stop motion would normally introduce), which got annoying pretty damn fast, mostly because I couldn't actually SEE what was going on. I would happily go back and see this in plain ol' 2D.
I felt exactly the same way, and I think that's still the MAJOR flaw with the 3D presentation. It all looks great until things start moving faster than your eyes can track. It was one (of many) reasons I found Beowulf to be just unbearable.

Oh, and I think you just sold me on the book, Kean! ;)

User avatar
dark77778
Posts: 468
Joined: Thu Apr 24, 2008 11:03 am
Location: Toronto

Post by dark77778 » Wed Feb 11, 2009 9:01 pm

My best friend is actually reading the Coraline book now before seeing the movie so it'll be interesting to see how your comparison of the book to film fits his Kean, but I bet it'll be the same. I get this very non book vibe from this film, as though it was a very loose adaptation of the novel, so I actually want to still read the book as a separate work.

But I mean, I went into this film knowing that this was the same director that did James and the Giant Peach, which I remember as a kid reading the book, did not at all feel like the movie, but I loved them both the same.
I'm my own breed of eccentric.

User avatar
Tony
Posts: 1152
Joined: Sun Apr 11, 2004 7:14 pm
Location: Vancouver, BC
Contact:

Post by Tony » Wed Feb 11, 2009 10:48 pm

Amy, re: the connection to the character - I had the exact same thing. Perhaps it's due to the missing elements that Kean mentions. I wanted more character from Coraline. I wanted her to feel uncertain and unsure when she's hiking out to the well, and I wanted there to be some sort of reaction from her to her first night in the new house. I don't care how she reacted to it, I just wanted something more than her benign acceptance of the new situation. When she runs from the idea of getting her eyes sewn out (oh hey, SPOILERS), it felt very unmotivated for me. She didn't seem that invested in this alternate world for it to really mean anything when things turn sour. She seemed sort of ambivalent to everything, sort of like a ping-pong ball bouncing off different external forces. It was as if the filmmakers expected her to act as an avatar for the viewer (which didn't help the videogame-feeling), rather than behave like an actual character.

I was also bumped by some of the animation - the scene where Coraline meets Wyborn, in particular, was over-animated and poorly matched to the dialogue.

Otherwise, the craftsmanship was astounding, and the movie's an excellent technical achievement. Still, I prefer a lot of the work that went into the movie (a friend just pointed me to Jon Klassen's contributions...) over the movie itself.

User avatar
Tony
Posts: 1152
Joined: Sun Apr 11, 2004 7:14 pm
Location: Vancouver, BC
Contact:

Post by Tony » Wed Feb 11, 2009 10:55 pm

Oh also, talking to a friend it turns out that the 3D in the theatre we went to might have been broken. Not sure if that's true or not, but maybe you'll have had a better 3D experience.

Anyone know the technicalities of the method? I'm just guessing here: It feels like the film's projected at 24fps, with alternating frames devoted to either eye. So, you're watching the whole movie at 12fps. If that's the case, that would easily explain the problems in the fast-moving scenes. Also, stop-motion animation doesn't come with built-in motion blur, which would have helped a bit.

EDIT: For anyone unfamiliar with animation techniques, most 2D traditional animation is shot at 12fps (or "on twos"), except for moments of quick action or when a character needs to match to a moving BG, which is all done "on ones" at 24fps. Not sure how stop-motion works - maybe you need to establish a consistent frame rate, or maybe you can change it up like in 2D. CG 3D is, of course, always at 24fps, because the computer does all your inbetweens for you.

User avatar
Josh-Ulrich
Posts: 488
Joined: Sun Mar 12, 2006 6:57 pm
Location: Jacksonville, FL
Contact:

Post by Josh-Ulrich » Fri Feb 13, 2009 9:37 pm

Okay I just saw the movie and I absolutely loved it. I was really hesitant to see this movie, but I had a blast! The 3D really made the visual experience fun. After this and Bolt, I'm really happy with the direction 3D is going.

However, somebody please PM me or something and explain what the deal is with the after credits..? Other then looking kind of cool, it was entirely a pointless waste of me sitting in the theater for ten minutes. What am I not getting? Somebody school me on this, cuz I was disappointed.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest