Site Design

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pinkpanther
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Site Design

Post by pinkpanther » Tue Nov 08, 2005 7:52 pm

As I've noticed in my short stay here, many of you have webbed sites. I'm in the entertainingly frustrating process of designing my own at the moment, and I was wondering if anyone had any advice or helpful tips?

I've designed several in the past, but I wanted to start over fresh this time. It is a site for a comic of sorts, so if anyone has tips specific to that, that'd be nice.

Any ideas for layout? Good places to go for inspiration?

Everyone having a pleasant day?

Thanks in advance for your input! Hope to show you the finished product of my labor someday soon!

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Dek
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Post by Dek » Tue Nov 08, 2005 10:04 pm

World's best place for inspiration is definately CSS Zen Garden. Not only is it easy to figure out - since the original HTML never changes, just the CSS stylesheet - a full source code is provided! Nifty!

There's also about a billion and a half designs.

http://www.csszengarden.com[/url]

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Post by habel » Wed Nov 09, 2005 9:19 pm


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pinkpanther
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Post by pinkpanther » Wed Nov 09, 2005 9:20 pm

Hm. Those are very good sites.

In your opinions though, what makes a site good in design? What kind of comic sites exemplify this?

Thanks again for the time!

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Tony
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Post by Tony » Wed Nov 09, 2005 11:38 pm

Sorry, quick note: no not, under any circumstances, use Comic Sans. This is an obvious tip, but a lot of people make the mistake. There are plenty of free alternative comic book fonts. Ahem, Blambot.com.

www.bancomicsans.com

Oh, and if you use dreamweaver, i found the dual-pane view to be helpful. That's where you can see the html at the same time as the layout, which helped me learn a lot about the code.

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Mothos
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Post by Mothos » Thu Nov 10, 2005 12:18 am

I usually have various W3 School pages open on my desktop for constant refferal. The the dual-pane view is a good thing, WYSIWYG editors put in some dirty, dirty code into a page.

CSS is a given now, no website should be without one.

And if you're more technically minded, A List Apart is a great resource for tips, tricks, techniques and info on what the pros are doing now and what they plan on doing in the future.

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jdalton
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Post by jdalton » Thu Nov 10, 2005 12:16 pm

Here's a few very, very basic things to include.

Most sites have the "latest page" right on the main page to encourage people to click further and read the rest. For navigation, the standard seems to be to have first, back, forward, and latest buttons either above or below each page in the archive.

Here's a few things I like to add, though I am clearly in the minority on these ones as most people don't do them.

I don't like scrolling, so I like to put my forward and back buttons on either side of the comic rather than above or below. I also like to have linkable page numbers under each comic page so that each page is accessable from every other and so you can know how far through the story you are.

Jonathon Dalton
A Mad Tea-Party

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neil
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Post by neil » Thu Nov 10, 2005 3:10 pm

All good suggestions...

Try not to use any frames at all.

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Ian Jay
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Post by Ian Jay » Thu Nov 10, 2005 7:38 pm

Here's a very, very good rule of thumb for webcomic sites that I learned the hard way: People (by which I mean people who browse webcomics) do not like scrolling anywhere. Seriously. If people have to go way way down and way way to the right to read your entire strip, then they're eventually going to lose interest because they don't want to do the work. Put your comic near the top and horizontal center of your page, and try to keep it within the confines of the visible screen (unless that would interfere with the whole concept/art of the comic, in which case, do whatever feels natural). That way people will be able to blur through your comics with the greatest of ease.

~IJ

PS: Instead of having First, Previous, Next, and Latest buttons, I have Then, Before, After, and Now navigational aides. This sometimes confuses people. Too bad for them.
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dan
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Post by dan » Thu Nov 10, 2005 8:40 pm

frames=satan incarnate.

:D

dan
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jpjpjp
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Post by jpjpjp » Sat Nov 12, 2005 11:07 pm

I'm also interested in this subject.

I have extremely limited knowledge of how to build a site. I can use Photoshop/Image Ready and Dreamweaver in very minimal ways.

I'm looking to redesign my site [www.onepercentpress.com] to be more easily updated, have a place for a daily comic to be displayed [also easily updated and archived], space for a blog, and of course the books.

Kazu's, Kean Soo and Neil Babra's sites both appeal to me layout wise.

The CSS stuff looks fantastic, but I have no idea how to do any of it, or even go about learning... any recommendations?

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Kazu
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Post by Kazu » Sun Nov 13, 2005 12:55 am

I used to do lots of fancy pants stuff like actionscripting in Flash on my site. After a while, I found that this was totally unnecessary. For me, I like sites that are streamlined and get me the information I'm looking for, faster, so I decided to make the site as basic and fluid as possible. Basic in that the information is simple and clear and cleanly archived, and Fluid in that I leave certain sections to be easily interchangeable (like the header image).
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pinkpanther
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Post by pinkpanther » Fri Nov 18, 2005 8:18 pm

http://www.thesordidaffairs.net

How'd it turn out?

Advice?

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ikaruga
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Post by ikaruga » Fri Nov 18, 2005 11:14 pm

well if you need to I can teach you flash over msn or email and give you some time design basics. :)
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pinkpanther
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Post by pinkpanther » Sun Nov 20, 2005 11:18 am

Well, I don't know if I'd want flash for site design, but I was just thinking I might be able to use it to animate my content... Hm. I'll think upon it.

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