Literary Agents for Graphic Novels

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gau dog
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Literary Agents for Graphic Novels

Post by gau dog » Tue Jul 01, 2008 11:45 am

I'm looking for agents who specialize in graphic novels. Can anyone recommend some? I've done internet research but am interested in hearing something via word of mouth. Personal experiences are particularly desired.

I'd also be interested in hearing what kind of royalties/advances creators are getting.

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Okie Dokie
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Post by Okie Dokie » Tue Jul 01, 2008 3:18 pm

What a coincidence. Today I was searching the same thing.
Only info I know is that lit agents usually charge a (edit. I was saying 30%, but I think most charge 15%) in contrast to comic agents that do a 10 or 15%
I discovered an agent blog, although you may know of it already, if you search for graphic novels they mention some agencies:
http://www.guidetoliteraryagents.com/blog/

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Mac McCool
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Post by Mac McCool » Thu Jul 17, 2008 7:38 am

More and more literary agents are looking at selling graphic novels. If you google "literary agent" AND "graphic novel", you'll find a lot of names. Because many author-agent relationships become quite personal, most folks won't feel too comfortable posting public comments about their experiences, unless they're all rosy (and some agents get very high marks from the artists they work with, so it actually happens fairly often).

Finding the right agent is a bit like dating. For the artist and the agent to be happy in the long run, it should be a match. So doing your homework, going to meet agents at book events, all these things are a good idea. Naturally, you shouldn't swoon and say yes to the first person showing interest in your work, unless you have gotten to know them and consider them professional and sincere.

As for their rates, I hear the same info as Okie Dokie. Literary agents charge about 15%, artist reps about 25%.

Keep in mind that with so many agents going into graphic novels, finding an agent who genuinely cares about this art form (rather than some seeking to just sell another product) will likely pay off more and be a more rewarding experience. Some of the more caring agents will work with you to edit your proposal, fine-tune your story, writing, and visual story-telling in order to turn your proposal into a graphic novel that most publishers would love to acquire.

Good luck!

gau dog
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Post by gau dog » Thu Jul 17, 2008 1:56 pm

Well, I can't say I'll be going about my selection and approach entirely in terms of conventional thought. In any case, I'll guess I'll just have to find out how it goes down by doing it and seeing what happens down the line whether it works out or not.

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angeldevil
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A year with an agent for my book:

Post by angeldevil » Mon Jul 21, 2008 5:58 pm

So, I did land an agent, and I can't say it's been a picnic. I had a thread about this a while ago, and this seems like a fair venue to share my experience... I'm not sure if my agency just doesn't know how to sell a graphic novel, or if my agent is unexperienced, or if my book just sucks. But even with the agent, I've had no movement, so it's safe to say having an agent doesn't mean you'll land a publisher. Also, I was rather hoping the agent would be a good buffer considering my lousy personality (especially in business situations) but the truth is I find myself sending out a lot of submission packages personally, mind that Ms. Lit Agent still gets her 20% even if I do all the leg work. After talking to some non-comics authors who've had agents, they say that there is a tendency to sign too many people and then blow off projects that are a hard sell (ie a comic sometimes) which can lead to the creator spending a year sitting on their hands with an agent they have trouble getting information out of.

On the up side (maybe not for me, Ms Lacks-basic-social-skills) many traditional publishers seem to have opened their submissions policies a good deal, some even putting out calls for new work from authors, sans agent. And many of these joints seem to want comics. So start poking around websites.

I have a few months left on my contract with the agency. I don't think I will re-sign if they offer. If another agent approaches me in the future, I might consider giving it a try, but I'd be a lot more wary. My agency might sell my book yet, so I don't want to rag on them. I can't say I've had a positive enough experience to send anyone else there or I would be happy to share, give references, etc. We're all artists, we're all in the same boat.


Anyway, better luck then Ive been having if you go down this road guys!!

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jdalton
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Re: A year with an agent for my book:

Post by jdalton » Wed Jul 30, 2008 2:21 pm

angeldevil wrote:After talking to some non-comics authors who've had agents, they say that there is a tendency to sign too many people and then blow off projects that are a hard sell (ie a comic sometimes) which can lead to the creator spending a year sitting on their hands with an agent they have trouble getting information out of.
Well then don't sit on your hands and keep plugging the book yourself agent or no. For me, I think an agent is at least a good thing to have when it comes time to sign a contract. I would very happily give an agent their cut if it means having that assurance that I won't regret what I've signed. Regardless of who got the book in front of the publisher. I've seen too many bad contracts and not enough good ones to think that I would be able to manage that part on my own.

I can think of other good reasons to have an agent, but this to me seems like the best reason.
Jonathon Dalton
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angeldevil
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Post by angeldevil » Wed Jul 30, 2008 6:59 pm

Yes, I agree with you! And if I can land myself a contact I am sure she will cut a decent deal! The problem is getting to that point... which is something I've always had a problem with (self promotion) which is why I signed with an agent...

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thirdeyeh
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Post by thirdeyeh » Fri Aug 01, 2008 9:50 am

http://www.agentquery.com/

Check this site out. I used the search bar on the side to scan for agents who look at graphic novels.
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JonS
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Post by JonS » Tue Aug 05, 2008 1:34 pm

cool stuff, this is a great thread!

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