references

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elisio
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references

Post by elisio » Sat Dec 08, 2007 6:07 am

hello everyone,
i'm working on a story taking place on the US East Coast in the first
half of the 19th century and i'm in need of anything from type of clothing to boats to any little thing that might help me put the story on solid grounds. since i live in France and in the country you'll understand that a trip to the local library is out of the question for me, so i turned to the internet.
i'm having some trouble coming out with good reference documents (pictures, prints, paintings, etc) off the internet. i find Google and the likes too random and quite tiresome.
so could you recommend me some urls please? or if that issue has already been adressed on a previous post, just give me the link.

thank you in advance.

e.

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angeldevil
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Post by angeldevil » Sat Dec 08, 2007 7:22 am


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Mac McCool
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Post by Mac McCool » Sat Dec 08, 2007 8:55 pm

A lot of things changed from 1800 to 1850, with the U.S. partaking in the Industrial Revolution, coming out of a mostly rural way of life. So my first advice would be to focus on a smaller slice of time (one or two decades).

For the fashion, Europe still heavily influenced the U.S.A. early on in your time period, so you can probably safely use generic clothes from European sources for 1800 through the 1820s. Keep in mind the climate difference: in the Northeastern U.S., the summer are often much hotter (and more humid) than in Continental Europe (say Paris), and the winters far colder and snowier. This would affect clothing and architecture.

Felix Octavius Carr (F.O.C.) Darley, America's earliest illustration "superstar" really got his big start when Edgar Allan Poe asked him to draw illustrations for a Philadelphia magazine. So Darley's engravings, especially when he depicted people and events contemporary to his life, could prove useful. Unfortunately, because he's an illustrator (not a "fine art" painter), it's a little bit difficult to find his illustrations.

Look into early photography too. By the 1840s, photography had become relatively common, so I'm sure there are plenty of examples of North American scenes and people from that decade.

Finally, although painters of the times more frequently painted rich folks than the common people, you can still find great visual information by looking at American fine arts painters of the 19th century.

Bonne chance!

C'est une BD pour enfants ou adultes?

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elisio
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Post by elisio » Sun Dec 09, 2007 5:17 am

thank you both for your help. i'm going to look into all this.

Mac McCool: it's an adult book i suppose. funny you would mention him because it's actually an adaptation of one Edgar Allan Poe's stories. mais chut! je ne peux rien dire de plus pour le moment.

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